Mauritius Basics

Print this Guide Print this Guide | Email this Guide Email this Guide

The Basics

Time: Local time is GMT +4.

Electricity: Electrical current is 230 volts, 50Hz. Square three-pin plugs and round two-pin plugs are commonly used.

Money: The currency of Mauritius is the Mauritian Rupee (MUR), which is divided into 100 cents. Foreign currency can be exchanged at banks, bureaux de change and larger hotels. ATMs are widely available in most big towns and some hotels, and major restaurants and large retailers accept major credit cards.

Currency Exchange Rates

MUR1.00 = USD 0.03GBP 0.02CAD 0.04AUD 0.04ZAR 0.41EUR 0.03NZD 0.04
Note: These rates are not updated daily and should be used as a guideline only.

Language: English is the official language of Mauritius, but the most widely used language is French and the local dialect, Creole. Hindi, Urdu, and Chinese are also spoken.

Entry requirements for Americans: US citizens must have a passport that is valid for the period of intended stay in Mauritius. A visa is not required for stays of up to 90 days.

Entry requirements for UK nationals: British citizens must have a passport that is valid for the period of intended stay in Mauritius. No visa is required for holders of British passports for stays of up to 90 days, irrespective of the endorsement regarding their national stuatus contained therein.

Entry requirements for Canadians: Canadian citizens must have a passport that is valid for the period of intended stay in Mauritius. A visa is not required four tousist stays up to 90 days.

Entry requirements for Australians: Australian citizens must have a passport that is valid for the period of intended stay in Mauritius. No visa is required for stays of up to 90 days.

Entry requirements for South Africans: South African citizens must have a passport that is valid for the period of intended stay in Mauritius. No visa is required for stays of up to 90 days.

Entry requirements for New Zealanders: New Zealand citizens must have a passport that is valid for the period of intended stay in Mauritius. No visa is required for stays of up to 90 days.

Entry requirements for Irish nationals: Irish citizens must have a passport that is valid for the period of intended stay in Mauritius. No visa is required for stays of up to 90 days.

Passport/Visa Note: All foreign passengers to Mauritius must hold (i) a confirmed booking for accommodation in Mauritius, (ii) return or onward tickets to their country of origin or residence, (iii) the necessary travel documentation for their next destination, and (iv) sufficient funds to cover their expenses while in the country (a minumum of USD 100 per day). Note that the final decision to admit any passenger into Mauritius rests solely with the Immigration Authorities, and that any visitor who remains in Mauritius after expiry of the period granted on their visa or entry permit, shall be deemed to have committed an offence, and shall be liable for prosecution by a Court of Law. A yellow fever vaccination certificate is required to enter Mauritius, if arriving within 10 days of leaving or transiting through an endemic area. NOTE: It is highly recommended that your passport has at least six months validity remaining after your intended date of departure from your travel destination. Immigration officials often apply different rules to those stated by travel agents and official sources.

Travel Health: No vaccination certificates are required for entry into Mauritius, unless travelling from a country infected by yellow fever or where yellow fever is classified as endemic. Vaccinations are usually recommended for hepatitis A and hepatitis B. It's also a good idea to pack shoes that can be worn in the sea to protect against sharp coral, sea urchins and stonefish. Stonefish stings are uncommon but can in some cases be fatal. You should obtain urgent medical attention if stung; many hotels stock anti-venom serum. Visitors should take precautions against mosquito bites, as there have been several cases of the Chikungunya virus, which is spread by mosquitoes, although this is more common from October to May. Malaria medication may also be necessary, if visiting rural areas. Travellers should stick to bottled water. Medical facilities are good and free in public hospitals, but private clinics are expensive and medical insurance is recommended. Medications are usually easily available, but for peace of mind it is better to take any prescription medication with you, in its original packaging, with a signed and dated note from your doctor detailing what it is and why you need it. Note that visitors can bring common medicines for personal use into the country but must carry a copy of the prescription and proof that the drugs have been obtained legally. Other drugs like tranquillisers, hypnotics, narcotics, and other strong pain killers will require prior authorisation.

Tipping: Tipping in Mauritius is discretionary. However, some extra money paid for services, such as a taxi ride, waitering or cleaning, is appreciated. In the hotels travellers can add around five percent of their incidental expenses when paying the bill on departure, if service has been good. Government tax is added to all hotel and restaurant bills and this is included in the basic price. However, all incidental hotel expenses will incur tax, which is generally included in the price quoted.

Safety Information: Mauritus is generally regarded as a safe country but visitors should take regular precautions against petty crime. Avoid walking alone in unfamiliar areas at night and keep valuables out of sight at all times. Visitors should be aware of pick pocketing in the central market in Port Louis. Care should be taken of bags and valuables when visiting popular tourist areas such as Pereybere, Grand Baie, Flic en Flac, and Tamarin.

Local Customs: Homosexuality is not technically illegal in Mauritius, but sodomy is and it is best to exercise discretion as the locals are sometimes conservative. Penalties for drug trafficking and use are severe, and any personal medicinal drugs should be covered by a prescription. Scheduled drugs, such as tranquillisers, morphine, and other strong painkillers require by law authorisation before import.

Business: Port Louis is the main business hub of Mauritius. Standard business practice applies to the island: punctuality and politeness is important, handshakes and the exchanging of business cards takes place at meetings, and business attire is worn. It is, however, possible to be somewhat more casual in terms of dress and visitors can take the cue from their hosts. Lightweight materials are recommended due to the tropical climate. Business hours vary, but most businesses are open at least from 9am to 4pm Monday to Friday, with some businesses open for a half-day on Saturdays.

Communications: The international access code for Mauritius is +230. The whole island is covered by the mobile network; the local mobile phone operators use GSM and 3G networks, which are compatible with most international operators.

Duty Free: Travellers to Mauritius over 18 years do not have to pay duty on 200 cigarettes or 50 cigars or 250g tobacco; 1 litre spirits and 2 litres of wine, ale or beer; perfume and eau de toilette for personal use. Prohibited items include sugarcane and fresh fruit from parts of Asia. Other prohibited items include dangerous drugs, obscene literature, and pornographic materials.


Feedback


Travel Guide powered by Word Travels, copyright © 2020 Globe Media Ltd. All rights reserved. By its very nature much of the information in this guide is subject to change at short notice and travellers are urged to verify information on which they're relying with the relevant authorities. Neither Globe Media nor The Global Travel Group can accept any responsibility for any loss or inconvenience to any person as a result of information contained above.