Edinburgh Day Trips

St Andrews
St Andrews © Evan Wilson

St Andrews

The historic city of St Andrews is home to one of the most famous golf clubs in the world, The Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St Andrews. Often referred to as 'the home of golf', St Andrews and the British Golf Museum will be enjoyable for any enthusiasts of the sport. With 500 years of golfing history, the museum will take visitors on an exciting journey through the sport's heritage and provide an introduction to the world's golfing legends. Golf aside, St Andrews is an attractive, historic city and is also home to the prestigious University of St Andrews, the oldest university in Scotland and the third oldest in the English-speaking world. Students make up a third of the population during the academic term, giving the old city a youthful energy and fun nightlife. Once the ecclesiastical capital of Scotland, the city's famous and ancient cathedral was destroyed during the Scottish Reformation and now lies in ruins. However, many other historic buildings remain intact and St Andrews prevails to be an atmospheric city with a rich cultural life as well as some of the world's best golfing opportunities.

Address: Bruce Embankment, St Andrews; E-mail: standrews@visitscotland.com; Telephone: +44 1334 472021; Transport: From Edinburgh, follow signs for Forth Road Bridge, take the A92 towards Kirkcaldy and Glenrothes and then follow signs for Cupar and St. Andrews



Dumfries
Dumfries © Craig Murphy

Dumfries

Known as the 'Queen of the South' and birthplace of both world-famous poet Robert Burns and James Barrie, author of Peter Pan, the quaint and picturesque town of Dumfries may not be as large as some of its neighbours, but it is warm, welcoming and beautiful. In 1997 Dumfries was voted the best place to live in the UK, and is still considered by many to be just that, due to its mild climate, lovely setting and the exuberant charm of the locals. Most of the buildings in Dumfries are built with local red sandstone, which comes from Locharbriggs, giving them a unique character and the city a distinctive look and feel. Around town, visitors with an interest in Dumfries' most famous resident, Robert Burns, can visit no end of sites associated with the poet, including Burns' House, Burns' Museum, Burns Street, Burns' Mausoleum and even his regular corner pub, the old Globe Inn. Other attractions include the Bridge House Museum, the magnificent triangular Caerlaverock Castle and its nature reserve, New Abbey and the Solway Coast. Scotland's seventh largest river, the River Nith, which runs through the centre of Dumfries, creates a picturesque setting and offers fabulous fishing opportunities right on the town's doorstep. Hit the links and enjoy a round of 18 holes on one of 30 of Scotland's finest golf courses, including Thornhill and Stranraer. Alternatively, put those hand-tied flies to good use when casting for brown trout in the nearby Lochmaben, which has a couple of good fishing lochs; or try for salmon, sea trout and trout from the banks of the River Nith. Just out of town, take a walk along the nearby coastline or high above on the cliff tops where waves crash below and the cool North Atlantic sea breeze invigorates you.

Stirling Castle
Stirling Castle © dun_deagh

Stirling Castle

One of the most impressive castles in Scotland, Stirling Castle has a famous history of clashes between British troops and Scottish revolutionaries. Its bridge is the site of one of William Wallace's major victories, and the field of Bannockburn was the venue for the triumph of Robert the Bruce. Stirling Castle was also home to generations of Scottish monarchs, including Mary Queen of Scots. The views of the surrounding countryside, including the famous Wallace Monument, are spectacular. Free guided tours run throughout the day and there is an excellent audio guide available in English, French, German, Italian, Spanish and Japanese for a small extra cost. The fascinating history of the castle makes it worthwhile to hire an audio guide, or at least do some research beforehand, as past events bring the sprawling castle and surrounding area magnificently to life. Even without the audio guide, there are exhibitions and displays offering some information about the castle and the important battles fought there. Although some of the castle is in ruin, other areas have been carefully restored to give visitors a sense of how it must have looked during its glory days.

Address: Castle Wynd, Stirling; E-mail: stirlingcastle@hes.scot; Website: www.stirlingcastle.gov.uk; Telephone: +44 1786 450 000; Opening time: Open daily, from 9.30am to 6pm (1 April to 30 September); and from 9.30am to 5pm (1 October to 31 March). Last admission is always 45 minutes before the closing time; Admission: £15 (adults), £9 (children 5-15). Concessions available.



Falkirk Wheel
Falkirk Wheel © Martin Burns

Falkirk Wheel

The Falkirk Wheel, a rotating boat-lift located near the town of Falkirk in central Scotland, is an unlikely but extremely popular Scottish tourist attraction. The Wheel, which was built as part of an initiative to rejuvenate Scotland's canals and waterways, is a tremendous feat of engineering. Visually spectacular, the Falkirk Wheel has an overall diameter of 115 feet (35m), and features two 45-foot (15m) mechanical arms, shaped like double-headed Celtic axes. A landmark in Scottish engineering, the Falkirk Wheel features on the obverse of the country's £50 note. An increasingly popular day excursion from Edinburgh, visitors to the Falkirk Wheel can enjoy 50-minute boat rides on the Union Canal that feature an exciting 'lift' on the Falkirk Wheel. Kids will also love the Waterwalkerz Activity Zone found at the site, and the whole family can enjoy the four miles (7km) of woodland walking trails that surround the area. Bicycles can also be hired. The Falkirk Wheel hosts some special events, including some deals for Christmas and similar occasions. A fun and educational day out with the kids, a trip to the Falkirk Wheel is highly recommended for family vacationers in Scotland.

Address: Lime Road, Tamfourhill; E-mail: info@thefalkirkwheel.co.uk; Website: www.thefalkirkwheel.co.uk; Telephone: +44 87 0050 0208 ; Opening time: Open Wednesday to Sunday, from 11am to 4pm. Opening times are extended in the summer months - check the official website for details.; Admission: Boat rides: £12.95 (adults), £7.50 (children). Concessions available.


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