Reykjavik Day Trips

Blue Lagoon
Blue Lagoon © Alicia Pettit

Blue Lagoon

A favourite and unique attraction close to Reykjavik, about 30 miles (50km) southwest of the city, is the manmade geothermal Blue Lagoon. It is set in a lava field, filled with mineral-rich hot water pumped from about a mile below the surface. The lagoon is flanked by a luxurious health spa where visitors come to be pampered and treated for skin ailments like eczema and psoriasis. The lagoon's surreal phosphorescent aquamarine colour is caused by the therapeutic ecosystem of algae, silica, and minerals in the water. The Blueline bus company offers transport to and from the Blue Lagoon, and other transport options are outlined on the official website. Visitors should note that the Blue Lagoon is very popular and should be booked as far in advance as possible to avoid disappointment. The opening times change seasonally and can be found on the website listed below.

Address: 240 Grindavik, Iceland; Website: www.bluelagoon.com; Transport: Schedules buses are available from Reykjavik.; Opening time: Opening times are seasonal, but Blue Lagoon is generally open 8am to 9pm.; Admission: 6990 ISK for the Comfort package



Gullfoss Falls, Iceland
Gullfoss Falls, Iceland © Diego Delso

Gullfoss Falls

Iceland's famed Gullfoss (Golden) Falls are justly rated among the most beautiful in the world, and make for a popular excursion from Reykjavik. The falls, with their awesome double-cascade, are incredibly powerful, which has meant they have come under threat of being utilised as a source of hydro-electricity. Currently, however, the magnificent natural water feature, shrouded in mist and rainbows and gushing into a canyon on the Hvita River, is safely ensconced in a national park and remains one of the country's top tourist attractions. The falls can be visited on Iceland's famous Golden Circle route, and many tour operators and public buses make daily trips to the national park during the warmer months.

Address: Gullfoss National Park; Website: www.gullfoss.is



Geysir erupting!
Geysir erupting! © Dieter Schweizer

Geysir

The weird landscape of the Haukadalur Valley in the southern lowlands of Iceland has been dominated for centuries by the Great Geysir. It's from here that all other such phenomena around the world have gained their name. The geyser once shot boiling water hundreds of feet into the air, but the height of the eruption has reduced in modern times. Nevertheless, it's still an impressive sight. The rest of the thermal area, bathed in a sulphuric smell, is just as fascinating, featuring several other spouting vents and geysers which frequently display their prowess. The Great Geysir has become a very popular tourist attraction, and a centre has been opened containing a multimedia geology museum and folklore exhibits. There is also a hotel, souvenir shop, and restaurant on site.

Address: Geysir Center, Geysir; Website: www.geysircenter.com; Transport: Situated on the Golden Circle tour route, or drive yourself.; Admission: Free



Thingvallavatn
Thingvallavatn © Reykholt

Thingvellir National Park

The national park of Thingvellir, 30 miles (50km) east of Reykjavik, is not only Iceland's most important historic site, but also a place of natural and geological wonder. It was here that the world's first-ever parliament, the Alting, initially convened in AD 930, and where Christianity was first introduced to Iceland. Even today, people gather at Thingvellir to celebrate any major national event. Geologically, this is the only site in the world where the American and European tectonic plates are visible. The park is also home to the largest lake in Iceland, and stunning scenery including a lava gorge, the Oxararfoss Waterfall, and the Money Chasm, where visitors drop coins down a gorge into water, to witness the strange distorted reflections that result. Activities available at Thingvellir National Park include hiking, angling, horseback riding, diving, and camping. The national park is open all year and in the warmer months a daily bus visits the park from Reykjavik.

Address: 801 Selfoss; Website: www.thingvellir.is/english



Jokilsarlon Lagoon, Iceland
Jokilsarlon Lagoon, Iceland © Molechaser

Jökulsárlón

Jökulsárlón - literally, 'glacier lagoon' - is the largest glacial lake in Iceland, and an enormously popular tourist attraction. The site shot to prominence after being featured in Hollywood movies (most memorably, Batman Begins), and now attracts thousands of visitors each year. Caused by the retreat of the glacier known as Breiðamerkurjökull, the lagoon is now nearly a mile (1.5km) from the ocean's edge, and is over 814 feet (248m) deep. Most easily approached from the fishing town of Höfn on Iceland's southern coast, visitors in search of an indelible memory of their time in the country should definitely make the trip to Jökulsárlón, where luminous blue icebergs float eerily across the freezing water. Whatever you do, don't forget to pack a camera - Jökulsárlón is undoubtedly one of the best sights Iceland has to offer, and in such a staggeringly beautiful country, that's really saying something.

Website: icelagoon.is


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